Letter to My Daughters: Real and Imagined

Let’s get this over with — Ack!!! I was compelled to write this letter to my daughters in response to this…

First of all, Susan Patton – Princeton grad….Is this really your big, meaning-of-life lesson you wish to impart to your imaginary daughters?

At your core, you know that there are other things that you need that nobody is addressing. A lifelong friend is one of them. Finding the right man to marry is another.

Seriously, that’s what she said. Read it for yourselves.

Advice for the young women of Princeton: the daughters I never had.

For most of you, the cornerstone of your future and happiness will be inextricably linked to the man you marry, and you will never again have this concentration of men who are worthy of you.

No, no, no, a thousand times no. And to those agreeing with her in the comments – ptooey.

I realize I should just dismiss this silly missive for what it is. One woman’s narrow-minded, clouded point-of-view, aimed at a very limited audience, of which, I am not a member.

Except, I have daughters, real and imagined, and I would be remiss if I let this one slide. If anything it gives me chance to impart my own thoughts on life and marriage.

Misinterpretation

Mrs. P. offers up a cautionary tale and advice to the young ladies of her alma mater based on questions asked after a business conference.

Questions she has interpreted to mean, that though Princeton grads are savvy, and smart enough for ivy league educations, they aren’t up to the task of procuring spouses. At least not once they’ve left the confines of their university.

That’s her supposition – young women are clueless as to how to find suitable men to marry once they graduate and join the work force. Women, presumably intellectually able to lead corporations? That, and women’s happiness and self-fulfillment is dependent on marrying “worthy” men. She advises they cull them from the collegiate pool before they’re snatched up by lessor women, you know, those outside the Princeton gene pool. Mothers, hide your sons.

They Wanted Assurance

Susan Patton’s letter was prompted by the Q&A that happened after the morning session of the Women and Leadership Conference. Comments and questions that were asked after all questions relating to the actual reason for being there, were answered.

Imagine these young women, students—who after having had a full load of intellectually stimulating speeches, and conversations — got personal querying their elders about life, friendships and making it all work.

Ma’am, where did you get the idea these question subsumed the importance of all that had transpired previous to those questions? Your letter implies their main interest in participating in the conference was mining you for dating advise. Did anyone actually say “Darn, too bad we had to listen to all that business and leadership tripe when all we really want to know was how to bag a husband?”

She couldn’t imagine these ivy-league educated, future leaders – generations away from her own college experience – were merely wondering how to manage their personal and professional lives?

Letter To My Daughters

Dear Eva, and Lillian, my darling daughters, and to all the other daughters I treat as if they are my own. I want you to read this woman’s letter and promise me you will never, ever let this kind of backwards-ass thinking define who you are. Or your idea of who ivy league women are. She, are not they.

It is plainly wrong to imagine you will find happiness and self-fulfillment through another. The major flaw in this thinking is, what happens if you don’t find a husband, or don’t want a husband, or he leaves you – who are you then?

The Only Life Lesson You Need.

Here it is, my big life lesson for you — self-fulfillment and happiness comes from defining your values, and ideals and living by those principles.

That’s it.

The Purpose of College

You are going to college to obtain an education. To explore worlds bigger than the one you currently reside, and expand the possibilities of who you are, and who you thought you could be. Hopefully, you will develop relationships with all manner of people, of all sexes, peers, and professors, and they will enrich your life, as you will theirs. If you can, travel and get to know the world through others eyes.

Marriage

The purpose of developing intimate relationships isn’t so you will find happiness or self-fulfillment through them. It is to support one another in the pursuit of personal fulfillment and happiness. A pursuit not dependent on the other but facilitated by it.

Find the person whose values, and ideals align with yours. Find the person who encourages you to pursue being the best person you can be for your own edification, not for theirs. And you in turn, be that partner.

If there is anything we have learned over the last few months, it is that other people’s marriages are not based on or defined by ours.

Ideally, and I’m hopeful it will be a legally sanctified choice for all, the definition of marriage is for the partners to define.

The current reality is — women have more decisions and choices to make trying to balance the physical and mental challenges of “having it all.”  I agree that it is mythologized to the point that women often end up feeling unfulfilled. Mrs. P’s answer to that reality is wrong headed, and counter productive.

Successful Relationships

My friends and I, those who have “worthy” husbands, stable, kind, involved partners, we still struggle with self-actualization. Because no matter the state of those relationships – it is not our partners who define us. Nor is it the roles we play in others lives, such as mother, daughter, friend.

The choices we make based on our own values, and morals, being true to these internalized motivations are what lead us to satisfaction and happiness.

The problem with defining yourself by others, is that people change, those relationships evolve, even dissolve — and when they do, who are you then?

If you are always you, you adapt, and respond. Above all, you are always true to you.

Now go out there and make good choices!

My Next Big Thing

Okay, Chris @ Life Your Way,  I’ll play. I’m flattered that you think of me, I just feel like my blog doesn’t warrant the attention—yet. But since I do have a book I’m working on I don’t feel so insecure answering.

The Next Big Thing

10 questions about my current writing project.

1) What is the working title of your book or project?

The Illusion of Marriage

2) Where did the idea come from for the book or project?

I can’t pinpoint a specific spark but it started with an opening and ending scene—I envisioned this story as a movie. I needed a plot for NaNoWriMo2011 and used this idea.

3) What genre does it fall under, if any?

Fiction: Literary/Family Drama

4) If applicable, whom would you choose to play your characters in a movie?

Jacob: Jamie Bell or Emile Hirsch, Helen: Bryce Dallas Howard-someone who can pull of uptight but warm.

5) What is the one-sentence synopsis of your manuscript or project?

Til death do us part: marriage meets reality.

6) Will your book be self-published or represented by an agency?

Yes, unless there is a third option by then.

7) How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?

The first 50k I did for NaNoWriMo2011. I pretended to work on it for a few month of 2012, but now I’m aiming to finish up the first draft by Feb 2013. At 60993, I’m guessing I have another 20-25k to write.

8) What other book or stories would you compare this story to with the genre?

I’m blanking on anything specific. It’s a tale of marriage like any other and unique as all of them are. The lovely Jessica Ruston has a list of fiction books on marriage on her blog.

9) Who or what inspired you to write this book or story?

A death in the family prompted an examination of the lives around me, the struggles we all go through the triumphs and such.

10) What else about the book or story might pique the reader’s interest?

There are several secrets being kept that possibly doom a relationship, a few unforgivable acts forgiven, a postpartum psychotic episode, delicious meals, baked goods, frolics in the sun, and a dog named Bachman.

Geez, that almost sounds interesting. I’d better get back to work.

Your Next Big Thing

Tagging others is tricky since there’s so much inbreeding around here, I don’t know anyone who hasn’t participated. So dear readers (all two of you) there is no obligation to play, but if you’d like to—copy/paste the questions, fill in your answers, post a link to your blog in my comments. Or if you’ve already blogged your, My Next Big Thing, and would like to get more traction, feel free to post a link in the comments.