Blog Share: You Should Be Reading

Two very funny bloggers I follow, Chris Dean at Pixie.c.d and Katie Pilkington at Nested traded blogs writing about their most embarrassing moments, and they are truly amusing.

No, I’m not sharing my most embarrassing moment, I don’t have one. Apparently, I have no shame.

I will however share the fact that I once sported a Dorothy Hamill haircut. It did not look like this.

shortandsassydorothyhamillad.jpg (JPEG Image, 145 × 200 pixels).

NaNoWriMo: Post November in April

The Post November NaNoWriMo Post of Depression…in April.

New year, old neurosis. You want to know how pathetic I am? I started this post Jan 15th, as a NaNoWriMo wrap-up and today is April 1st. How fitting since I’m feeling pretty foolish.

Outside of my writing group exercises, the most writing I’ve done is a few sprints on our FB page.  I could, in desperation, count the few sentences I’ve jotted here and there in the comment sections of friend’s blogs. But really, even those have been less than substantial.

Thankfully, as spring begins to assert itself, my main story is finally finding it’s way back into my head. This is the first time I’ve faced a completed first draft and I’m feeling like a deer caught in headlights. Revising is not for wimps. I’ve quaked in the face of goals, rereading and reediting the same  few chapters over and over. Must move forward.

I even spent an entire day trying to talk myself into quitting writing altogether, though that may have been the flu talking.

How to go about proceeding with the revision process has been weighing heavily on my mind. I’ve been searching for a method or plan of attack that makes sense to me. Shawn Coyne’s article What It Takes: The Math published on Steven Pressfield Online appeared in my inbox a few months ago helping to allay some of my editing fears and gave me a bit of structure to hang my work on. Though this is more an article about plotting from the beginning of the process (something I don’t do…maybe next time) it is helping me visualize where my story needs work and whether or not the ground work I’d already laid is on solid enough ground to continue.

I feel confident that I’ve kept the word count garbage to a minimum (a typical NaNoWriMo bi-product) but there are holes that need plugging and connections that need rewiring. Characters that need fleshing out and a few that shall be meeting the axe.

On March 6th I posted a link on our WriNoShore website about structuring your scenes. It’s an interesting method to keep in mind while revising. At this point I’ll try anything to get my mind back in the game.

I mainly need to have a plan, a method to my madness so that I can consistently meet my work goals each day. Knowing what I need to accomplish help me focus and pushes me forward.

Some links to the revising process.

Revising your novel in 10 easy steps

How I self-Edit My Novel in 15 Steps

25 Steps to Edit the Unmerciful Suck Out of  Your Story

 

To those of you embarking on the April NaNoWriMo Camp, watch out for poison ivy, and have fun.

 

 

Watch This: Paolo Nutini’s “Iron Sky”

Sexy, smooth and thrilling.

Yup, that’s my whole review.

Watch this.

Paolo Nutini “Iron Sky”

 

Wealth Inequality in America – YouTube

Wealth Inequality in America – YouTube.

NaNoWriMo:Winner 2013

http://cfiles.nanowrimo.org/nano-2013/files/2013/11/2013-Winner-Square-Button.png

It’s official, I’m a NaNoWriMo: Winner 2013. I finished on the 20th with a word count of 50,424. Since then I’ve pushed the count up to 53,433, which combined with 2011′s total brings this novel’s first draft to 116,725. There’s a lot of extraneous conversations and side story that needs to be cut; I’m guessing I can edit it down to 75-80K.

While I’m relieved to finally have the first draft done, I didn’t really enjoy utilizing the same story for NaNoWriMo. I often had to look-up names, and try to recall details that weren’t fresh in my mind and it slowed my writing down considerably. Yes, I know I still finished a week before the deadline and I can shut-up now.

We have an outstanding regional group, The WriNoShores, and they made a huge difference to many of our writer’s endeavors. We had a variety of well-attended write-ins from semi-serious all-day Saturday library affairs to small mid-morning cafe groups. We’ve become quite a spirited, and supportive group. The convivial nature of which was uplifting and inspiring. Happily, plans are afoot to continue meeting up after November.

We still have one big Saturday write-in left. A potluck lunch is planned at which those who’ve finished will play cheerleader to those still trying to reach their goal. It should be a blast (it was except for those of us finished distracting those still workign out the last few thousand words-sorry Sarah!).

We’ll wrap up the month Dec 8th with a TGIO Party and Reading, and present out own WriNoShore:Winner 2013 and participant certificates.

Overall, another fantastic month of writing, whining and chocolate eating (it was genius having this start the day after Halloween).